Cultic Relationships Between Buddhism and Brahmanism in the ‘Last Stronghold’ of Indian Buddhism

An Analysis with Particular Reference to Votive Inscriptions on the Brahmanical Sculptures Donated to Buddhist Religious Centres in Early Medieval Magadha

Authors

  • Birendra Nath Prasad ,B.B.Ambedkar Central University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsrv.v30i2.181

Keywords:

Late Indian Buddhism, Brahmanism, Buddhist sculptures, Brahmanical Scriptures, Magadha

Abstract

In this article, an attempt has been made to understand the patterns of cultic relationships between Buddhism and Brahmanism through the prism of dedicatory inscriptions on the Brahmanical sculptures donated to Buddhist religious centres in early medieval Magadha. I have looked into the social background of the donors and the expressed motives for donation of such images. I have argued that the Buddhist Sangha accepted the donation of Brahmanical sculptures to effect a mandalic appropriation of Brahmanical cults to Buddhism, though this does not seem to have been how the donors saw it. In the process, it exposed its own flank to a counter-appropriation by Brahmanism.

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Published

2014-01-01

How to Cite

Prasad, B. N. (2014). Cultic Relationships Between Buddhism and Brahmanism in the ‘Last Stronghold’ of Indian Buddhism: An Analysis with Particular Reference to Votive Inscriptions on the Brahmanical Sculptures Donated to Buddhist Religious Centres in Early Medieval Magadha. Buddhist Studies Review, 30(2), 181–199. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsrv.v30i2.181

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