https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/issue/feed Bulletin for the Study of Religion 2020-06-09T10:00:42+00:00 Richard Newton rwnewton@ua.edu Open Journal Systems <div> <p>The<em> Bulletin</em> began life in 1971 as the <em>CSSR Bulletin</em>. The journal<em> </em>publishes articles that address religion in general, the history of the field of religious studies, method and theory in the study of religion, and pedagogical practices. The Bulletin is unique in that it offers a forum for various academic voices to debate and reflect on the ever-changing state of the field, and insofar as it encourages scholars continually to engage meta-level questions at the leading edge of inquiry. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/about">Read more about the journal.</a></p> </div> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17816 It’s Not So Secret Anymore 2020-06-08T10:12:11+00:00 Philip L. Tite philip.tite@mail.mcgill.ca <p>Editor's introduction to the issue on the special theme "The Study of Christian Apocrypha". Offers an overview of recent trends in the study of Christian apocrypha, brief summary of each article in the issue, and sets forth several recommendations for future research. The editorial introduction closes with a personal farewell and notes of appreciation, as this is his final editorial introduction as editor of the journal.</p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17817 Even More Christian Apocrypha 2020-06-08T10:31:39+00:00 Tony Burke tburke@yorku.ca <p><em style="font-weight: 400;">New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, edited by Tony Burke and Brent Landau, was published in 2017. It is the first in a series of volumes of apocryphal Christian texts in English translation. This article offers some reflections on the reception of the volume—with a summary of and response to reviews in journals and two panel discussions—and on the process of assembling a second volume to be published in 2020. The article describes the contents of the second volume with particular emphasis on several Johannine apocrypha related to&nbsp;<em>er</em></span><em style="font-weight: 400;">?</em><em style="font-weight: 400;">tapokriseis</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;(or “question-and-answer” literature) and two texts that may reflect Chistian-Muslim interaction in late antique Egypt. The article concludes with a preliminary list of the texts to be included in a third volume to follow in 2022.</span></p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17818 A History of the Study of Apocrypha in Early Medieval England 2020-06-08T11:19:30+00:00 Brandon W. Hawk bhawk@ric.edu <p>Literature written in England between about 500 and 1100 CE attests to a wide range of traditions, although it is clear that Christian sources were the most influential. Biblical apocrypha feature prominently across this corpus of literature, as early English authors clearly relied on a range of extra-biblical texts and traditions related to works under the umbrella of what have been called “Old Testament Pseudepigrapha” and “New Testament/Christian Apocrypha." While scholars of pseudepigrapha and apocrypha have long trained their eyes upon literature from the first few centuries of early Judaism and early Christianity, the medieval period has much to offer. This article presents a survey of significant developments and key threads in the history of scholarship on apocrypha in early medieval England. My purpose is not to offer a comprehensive bibliography, but to highlight major studies that have focused on the transmission of specific apocrypha, contributed to knowledge about medieval uses of apocrypha, and shaped the field from the nineteenth century up to the present. Bringing together major publications on the subject presents a striking picture of the state of the field as well as future directions.</p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17819 Collusion or Critique? 2020-06-08T14:31:36+00:00 Tyler M. Tully tyler.tully@theology.ox.ac.uk <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While a variety of sources explore the character of Mary Magdalene and her popularly conceived configurations throughout history (Maisch 1998; King 2003, 2006; Jean-Yves 2002; Mead 2005; Kiely 2010), little attention has been paid to her representation in the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Gospel of Luke</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, specifically her scant exorcism and possession narratives. Drawing upon contemporary archaeological insights and historical and textual sources, this article reconstructs an image of Mary before exploring her presentation in the canonical and non-canonical accounts of the first two centuries CE. Working with similar methodologies pioneered by Stephen D. Moore (Moore 2004) and Virginia Burrus (Burrus 2009), in conversation with Mary L. Keller’s (Keller 2002, 2015) theoretical framework of spirit possession, this article investigates the possession and exorcism narratives of Mary Magdalene in Luke’s gospel from a postcolonial optic.</span></p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17820 The Study of Serbian Medieval Apocrypha 2020-06-08T15:35:44+00:00 Isidora Ana Stambolić isidora.ana@gmail.com <p>The paper seeks to give a brief overview of the scientific study of Serbian Medieval Apocrypha, from it's beginnings to the present day.</p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17823 The Role Of Apocrypha and Saints’ Lives, Their Transmission and Readership in The history of Childhood and Family 2020-06-09T09:12:11+00:00 Marijana Vuković m.vukovic2@uw.edu.pl <div>The article proposes to explore the potentials of examining Apocrypha and saints’ lives in pursuit of knowledge about children, childhood, and family in the past. It first stresses a necessity to accurately define Apocrypha and saints’ lives within early Christian literature. The transmission of Apocrypha and saints’ lives in their textual varieties, the number of manuscripts they appear in, and their absence of authorship also demand further discussion. Scholars additionally do not reach the consensus over their readership, reputation, and audience in the same period.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;Although a great deal of potential remains in these genres for the pursuances named above, one has to bear in mind the restrictions. One has to be cautious when prying out social realities from hagiography. One also has to distinguish the theological and religious aspects from the social realities and realities of everyday life in such texts, as well as to pay attention to their literary and genre aspects. Finally, one may wish to trace varieties of individual texts in manuscripts, because they sometimes give different information about our matters of interest.</div> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17824 Review Essay: The Buddha’s Wizards 2020-06-09T09:47:37+00:00 Justin W. Henry jhenry4@luc.edu <p>The Buddha’s Wizards: Magic, Protection, and Healing in Burmese Buddhism by Thomas Nathan Patton. New York: Columbia University Press, 2018. US $60 (hardcover). xxxiv + 187 pp. ISBN: 9780231187602.</p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSOR/article/view/17825 Review Essay: Once More on Religion and Magic: Daniel Dubuisson's Religion and Magic in Western Culture 2020-06-09T10:00:42+00:00 Andrew Durdin adurdin@fsu.edu <p>Daniel Dubuisson, Religion and Magic in Western Culture. Leiden: Brill, 2016. viii + 201 pp. Cloth, ebook $134, €101. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004317567</p> 2020-06-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd.