It’s Not So Secret Anymore

Shifts in the Study of Christian Apocrypha

Authors

  • Philip L. Tite University of Washington

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.41168

Keywords:

editorial, Bulletin for the Study of Religion, Christianity, apocrypha, method and theory

Abstract

Editor's introduction to the issue on the special theme "The Study of Christian Apocrypha". Offers an overview of recent trends in the study of Christian apocrypha, brief summary of each article in the issue, and sets forth several recommendations for future research. The editorial introduction closes with a personal farewell and notes of appreciation, as this is his final editorial introduction as editor of the journal.

Author Biography

Philip L. Tite, University of Washington

Philip L. Tite is an Affiliate Lecturer at the University of Washington and an adjunct instructor at Seattle University in Seattle WA USA. He holds a PhD degree from McGill University (2005) and has authored several books and articles. His most recent books include The Apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans: An Epistolary and Rhetorical Analysis (TENT, 7; Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2012) and Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (NHMS, 67; Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2009). As a specialist in the study of early Christianity, in particular Valentinian Gnosticism, Tite has strong interests in elucidating social processes at work in the study of religious phenomena. He also has strong interests in method and theory, religion and violence, and pedagogical issues in the academic study of religion.

References

Burke, Tony. 2013. Secret Scriptures Revealed: A New Introduction to the Christian Apocrypha. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans. https://doi.org/10.1111/rsr.12234_30.

Burke, Tony, editor. 2015. Forbidden Texts on the Western Frontier: The Christian Apocrypha in North American Perspectives. Proceedings from the 2013 York University Christian Apocrypha Symposium. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books. https://doi.org/10.1177/0014524616674646.

_____. 2012. “More Christian Apocrypha.” Bulletin for the Study of Religion 41 (3): 16–21.

Hawk, Brandon W. 2019. The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew and the Nativity of Mary. Early Christian Apocrypha 8. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books.

_____. 2018. Preaching Apocrypha in Anglo-Saxon England. Toronto

Anglo-Saxon Series 30. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. https://doi.org/10.3138/9781487516970-016.

Spittler, Janet, editor. Forthcoming. The Material of Christian Apocrypha. Studies in Ancient Religion and Culture. Sheffield: Equinox.

Tite, Philip L. 2017. “A Merry Muslim Christmas!” Religion Blog: Blogging Portal for the Bulletin for the Study of Religion. https://bulletin.equinoxpub.com/2017/01/a-merry-muslim-christmas/.

———. 2016. “A Note on Christian Sources for the Muslim Christmas Story.“ https://philiptite.wordpress.com/2016/12/30/a-note-on-christian-sources-for-the-mulimchristmas-story/.

Whitlock, Matthew G., editor. Forthcoming. Critical Theory and Early Christianity. Studies in Ancient Religion and Culture. Sheffield: Equinox.

Whitlock, Matthew G., and Philip L. Tite. Forthcoming. “The Many Acts of the Apostles: Simulacra and Simulation.” In Critical Theory and Early Christianity. Edited by Matthew G. Whitlock. Studies in Ancient Religion and Culture. Sheffield: Equinox.

Downloads

Published

2020-06-04

How to Cite

Tite, P. L. (2020). It’s Not So Secret Anymore: Shifts in the Study of Christian Apocrypha. Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 48(3-4), 1-3. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.41168

Issue

Section

The Editorial