Religions of South Asia http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA <p><em>RoSA</em> publishes papers by internationally respected scholars on some of the most vibrant and dynamic religious traditions of the world. It includes the latest research on distinctively South Asian or Indic religions - Hindu, Jaina, Buddhist and Sikh - religions which continue to influence the patterns of thought and ways of life of millions of people. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/about">Learn more about this journal.</a></p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Religions of South Asia 1751-2689 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Editorial http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/20972 <p>.</p> Simon Brodbeck Dermot Killingley Anna King Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 117–119 117–119 10.1558/rosa.20972 The Bhagavad Gita and Beyond http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/20974 <p>Paying particular attention to narrative frames, this paper explores five avenues of hermeneutic import availed by the interlocking structure of such texts: inception import, association import, exposition import, framing import and impetus import. It demonstrates the utility of this methodology by applying it to shed new light on the Bhagavad Gita’s place within the Mahabharata.</p> Raj Balkaran Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 120–141 120–141 10.1558/rosa.20974 The Indian Hair-Wringing Apsaras and her Discriminating Goose http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/20975 <p>The present study investigates depictions of the Indian apsaras wringing water from her hair in monumental religious iconography. It demonstrates the migration of iconography and transformations of meaning from the northern sources to other areas of India and ultimately to parts of southeast Asia. I examine ancient literary and visual sources of the hair-wringing apsaras, mediator of the life-giving celestial waters, and the goose that drinks her hair-water in Buddhist, Hindu and Jain artistic contexts, demonstrating expressions of abstruse theological concepts. The salient virtue of the mythic hamsa (migrating goose) was its ability to separate milk from water (nira-ksira-viveka). This discrimination, already mentioned in Vedic and later sources, was appropriated as a metaphoric image in moral, didactic, theological and philosophical contexts. Connotations implicit in the myth of the potent water that passes through the apsaras’s hair are compared to those of the rejuvenating waters that flowed through Siva’s ascetic locks in the myth of Gangadhara.</p> Simona Cohen Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 142–177 142–177 10.1558/rosa.20975 Promoting ‘Yogi Art’ http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/20976 <p>Yoga studies have inaugurated a vast amount of possible research areas that transcend the regional and the disciplinary. This paper probes into the history and reception of yoga in Latin America. In particular, it discusses the ways in which a post-revolutionary Mexican intellectual, José Vasconcelos, understood yoga in the 1920s. This early understanding of yoga was a combination of both socio-political discourses worldwide and the nationalist enterprise of building a modern nation, where notions of race, identity, and cleanliness were paramount. Through different writings, Vasconcelos interpreted both South Asian religions and the Americas as beneficial influences for the betterment of humanity. By noting the influence of different ideologies popular in Latin America (such as nationalisms, Social Darwinism, or Theosophy), this paper analyses the cultural context against which Vasconcelos outlined his understanding of yoga, India, national culture and progress.</p> Adrián Muñoz Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 178–203 178–203 10.1558/rosa.20976 In Dialogue with the Mahabharata, by Brian Black http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/21002 <p>In Dialogue with the Mahabharata, by Brian Black. Abingdon: Routledge, 2021. xii + 216pp. £120 (hb), £33.29 (ebook). ISBN 978-0-367-43600-1 (hb), 978-0-367-43814-2 (ebook).</p> Simon Brodbeck Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 204–206 204–206 10.1558/rosa.21002 Everyday Shi'ism in South Asia, by Karen G. Ruffle http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/21003 <p>Everyday Shi'ism in South Asia, by Karen G. Ruffle. Chichester: Wiley, 2021. xvii + 344 pp. $45 (pb). ISBN 978-1-119-35714-8</p> Fizza Joffrey Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 207–212 207–212 10.1558/rosa.21003 Phanigiri: Interpreting an Ancient Buddhist Site in Telangana, edited by Naman P. Ahuja http://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/21004 <p>Phanigiri: Interpreting an Ancient Buddhist Site in Telangana, edited by Naman P. Ahuja. Mumbai: The Marg Foundation, 2021. 228pp. £17.48. ISBN 978-9-383243-32-7.</p> Archishman Sarker Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-01-27 2022-01-27 15 2 213–215 213–215 10.1558/rosa.21004