http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/issue/feed Perfect Beat 2020-01-15T16:13:46+00:00 Shelley Brunt and Oli Wilson shelley.brunt@rmit.edu.au Open Journal Systems <p><em>Perfect Beat</em>&nbsp;first appeared in July 1992 and has been published by Equinox since 2009.&nbsp;<br>The journal's name derived from Afrika Bambaata and the Soul Sonic Force's 12-inch, 1983 single&nbsp;<em>Looking for the Perfect Beat</em>. As befits a journal originating in Australia, the journal remains focused on the popular music of the 'Pacific rim' and includes historical and contemporary studies with contributions invited from popular music studies, musicology, cultural studies and ethnomusicological perspectives.</p> http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16158 Editorial introduction 2020-01-15T16:13:40+00:00 Shelley Brunt shelley.brunt@rmit.edu.au Oli Wilson o.wilson@massey.ac.nz 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16173 Pauwke Berkers and Julian Schaap. 2018. 'Gender Inequality in Metal Music Production' 2020-01-15T16:13:44+00:00 Catherine Hoad C.Hoad@massey.ac.nz <p>Pauwke Berkers and Julian Schaap. 2018.&nbsp;<em>Gender Inequality in Metal Music Production</em>. London: Emerald Books. ISBN 978-1-78714-675-4 (pbk). 176 pp.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16175 Shelton Waldrep. 2016. 'Future Nostalgia: Performing David Bowie' 2020-01-15T16:13:45+00:00 Alison Blair alison.blair@postgrad.otago.ac.nz <p>Shelton Waldrep. 2016.&nbsp;<em>Future Nostalgia: Performing David Bowie.</em>&nbsp;New York and London: Bloomsbury Academic. ISBN 978-1-50132-522-9 (pbk). 219 pp.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16176 Shane Homan, Martin Cloonan and Jennifer Cattermole. 2016. 'Popular Music Industries and the State: Policy Notes' 2020-01-15T16:13:46+00:00 Emma-Jayne Reekie ereekie@liverpool.ac.uk <p>Shane Homan, Martin Cloonan and Jennifer Cattermole. 2016.&nbsp;<em>Popular Music Industries and the State: Policy Notes</em>. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415 82451-4 (hbk). 249 pp.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16160 Rationales in flux 2020-01-15T16:13:41+00:00 Andrew Faleatua afal1441@uni.sydney.edu.au <p>This article explores how Pacific artists’ notions of cultural authenticity, identity and perceived audience expectation play out in the composition of new transcultural music (i.e. music displaying an amalgamation of both traditional Pacific and contemporary popular music influences). It is grounded in ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Sydney, Australia over a period of two years. Its central aim is to balance a field of inquiry in which transcultural Pacific music is frequently interpreted as an expression of identity via retrospective musical analysis and reflection. In contrast to these prevailing trends, this article builds a case for real-time investigation into how artists engage and negotiate ideas about cultural authenticity, identity and perceived audience expectation when generating new transcultural works.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16162 From punk to platforms 2020-01-15T16:13:42+00:00 Jared Davis jared@jareddavisprojects.com <p>In this article I examine Melbourne’s Fast Forward cassette magazine (1980–1982), in order to develop a new theoretical analysis on the significance of cassette tape technology with regard to ‘do-it-yourself’ (‘DIY’) music cultures and neoliberal consumption. Fast Forward was a magazine in the form of a cassette tape, the brainchild of Melbourne music enthusiasts Bruce Milne, Andrew Maine and Michael Trudgeon. It featured new music, audio interviews as well as discussion somewhat like a recorded radio programme. The magazine was a significant proponent of the decentralized, international ‘cassette culture’ that developed in independent music during the 1980s. Recent literature regarding the digital economy considers how rather than mass producing and selling cultural content such as records, major entertainment companies today increasingly sell access to platforms through which content is shared, via subscription or through advertising. I argue that cassette culture offered an early pre-digital instance of this new paradigm shift of consumption, with Melbourne’s Fast Forward cassette magazine being a globally influential proponent of this new attitude towards music media’s participatory potential.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16166 Ebbs and flows 2020-01-15T16:13:43+00:00 Laura Glitsos lauraglitsos@outlook.com <p>This article calls for a recognition of women’s roles in contributing to the Perth popular music scene during the 1980s and 1990s. The research thus functions as a balance to the already established literature which explores Perth popular music around this period more broadly. The research herein indicates a surge in women’s musicianship following on from the relatively low levels of women’s participation in the late 1960s to early 1970s. It has also been noted in popular music studies literature that women in music are generally written out of dominant narratives. Thus, this research functions to redress some of those gaps. Through a mixed-methods approach comprising semi-structured interviews and literature review, it is revealed that women faced unique challenges for inaugurating community and securing careers in the Perth industry during the 1980s and 1990s. The greatest surge in participation occurs the mid- to late 1990s.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/16170 An interview with Ben Grayson 2020-01-15T16:13:44+00:00 Gene Shill gene.shill@rmit.edu.au <p>In this Riff article, Gene Shill speaks to Australian musician Ben Grayson, the founding member of The Bamboos and internationally acclaimed session keyboardist and electronic music producer. The conversation covers crate digging, sampling, ownership, authorship, musicianship, approaches to creating electronic music and how the affordances of technology assist the creative process.</p> 2019-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd.