Whitney A. Bauman (ed.), 'Meaningful Flesh: Reflections on Religion and Nature for a Queer Planet'

Authors

  • Mary L. Keller University of Wyoming

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.36875

Keywords:

book review

Abstract

Whitney A. Bauman (ed.), Meaningful Flesh: Reflections on Religion and Nature for a Queer Planet (Goleta, CA: Punctum Books, 2018), 149 pp., $19.00 (pbk), ISBN: 9781947447325.

Author Biography

Mary L. Keller, University of Wyoming

Mary Keller works at the intersection of feminist theory, postcolonial theory, and indigenous studies theory in order to study the relationship of religious lives to struggles for meaning and power.  She teaches Introduction to World Religions, African Spirits in the New World, African American Religious Culture, and Gilgamesh to the Bomb. Keller  emphasizes the geographical, historical and social context in which religious lives are embedded and then focuses on questions of personhood within religious traditions. Current research  examines the role of sacred land in a world of global capital, money and agency, and recent developments in theory and method in the study of spirit possession.

References

Baldwin, James. 1992. “Notes for a Hypothetical Novel.” In Nobody Knows My Name (New York: Vintage).



Driskill, Qwo-Li, Chris Finley, Brian Joseph Gilley, and Scott Lauria Morgensen eds. 2011. Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics, and Literature (Tucson: The University of Arizona Press).



White, Carol. 2016. Black Lives and Sacred Humanity: Toward an African American Religious Naturalism (New York: Fordham University Press).



Wulf, Andrea. 2015. The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science (New York: Penguin Random House).

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Published

2019-09-04

How to Cite

Keller, M. (2019). Whitney A. Bauman (ed.), ’Meaningful Flesh: Reflections on Religion and Nature for a Queer Planet’. Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture, 13(2), 254–256. https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.36875