http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/issue/feed Journal of Cognitive Historiography 2019-10-16T14:30:24+00:00 Nickolas P. Roubekas and Leonardo Ambasciano leonardo.ambasciano@mail.muni.cz Open Journal Systems <p><em><span lang="EN-US">The Journal of Cognitive Historiography</span></em>&nbsp;is the first peer-reviewed publication for research concerned with the interactions between history, historiography, and/or archaeology and cognitive theories.</p> http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13267 The “What is…?” Issue 2019-10-16T14:30:10+00:00 Leonardo Ambasciano leonardo.ambasciano@gmail.com Nickolas P. Roubekas nickolas.roubekas@univie.ac.at 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13284 Risto Uro, <i>Ritual and Christian Beginnings: A Socio-Cognitive Analysis</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:19+00:00 Luca Arcari luca.arcari@unina.it <div>Risto Uro, <em>Ritual and Christian Beginnings: A Socio-Cognitive Analysis </em>(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016). 230 pp. £55 (hbk). ISBN: 978-0-19966-117-6.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2017 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13285 Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber, <i>The Enigma of Reason</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:20+00:00 Bryon Cunningham bryoncunningham@gmail.com <div>Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber, <em>The Enigma of Reason</em> (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017). 396 pp. $29.95 (hbk). ISBN: 978-0-67436-830-9.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13289 Jonathan Kane, Emily Willoughby and T. Michael Keese, <i>God’s Word or Human Reason? An Inside Perspective on Creationism</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:21+00:00 Stefaan Blancke st.blancke@gmail.com <div>Jonathan Kane, Emily Willoughby and T. Michael Keese, <em>God’s Word or Human Reason? An Inside Perspective on Creationism</em> (Portland: Inkwater Press, 2016). 389 pp. $39.95 (hbk). ISBN: 978-1-62901-372-5.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13291 Walter Scheidel, ed., The Science of Roman History: Biology, Climate, and the Future of the Past 2019-10-16T14:30:22+00:00 Tomáš Glomb tomas.glomb@gmail.com <div>Walter Scheidel, ed., <em>The Science of Roman History: Biology, Climate, and the Future of the Past</em> (Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2018), 280 pp. £27.00/$35.00 (hbk). ISBN: 978-0-69116-256-0.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13292 Luther H. Martin and Donald Wiebe, eds, <i>Religion Explained? The Cognitive Science of Religion after Twenty-Five Years</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:23+00:00 Jennifer Larson jlarson@kent.edu <div>Luther H. Martin and Donald Wiebe, eds, <em>Religion Explained? The Cognitive Science of Religion after Twenty-Five Years</em> (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2017), xi + 260 pp. $102.60 (hbk). ISBN: 978-1-35003-246- 0; $39.95 (pbk). ISBN: 978-1-35010-592-8; $102.60 (PDF eBook). ISBN: 978-1-35003-247-7.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13302 Joëlla Proust and Martin Fortier, <i>Metacognitive Diversity: An Interdisciplinary Approach</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:23+00:00 Cory Marie Stade c.stade@soton.ac.uk <div>Joëlla Proust and Martin Fortier, <em>Metacognitive Diversity: An Interdisciplinary Approach</em> (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), 464 pp. £60.00 (hbk). ISBN: 978-0-19878-971-0.</div> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13304 Robert N. McCauley with E. Thomas Lawson,<i> Philosophical Foundations of the Cognitive Science of Religion: A Head Start</i> 2019-10-16T14:30:24+00:00 Konrad Talmont-Kaminski k.talmontkaminski@gmail.com <p>Robert N. McCauley with E. Thomas Lawson,<em> Philosophical Foundations of the Cognitive Science of Religion: A Head Start</em> (London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2017), 184 pp. £85.00 (hbk). ISBN: 978-1-35003-031- 2. £28.99 (pbk) ISBN: 978-1-35010-586-7. £91.80 (ePUB/kindle) ISBN: 978-1-35003-033-6. £91.80 (PDF) ISBN: 978-1-35003-032-9.</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13269 What is Cognitive Historiography, Anyway? Method, Theory, and a Cross-Disciplinary Decalogue 2019-10-16T14:30:11+00:00 Leonardo Ambasciano leonardo.ambasciano@gmail.com <p>This contribution offers a tentative systemization of different strands of method and theory in the sub-field of cognitive historiography in the form of a decalogue and 30 reflections. The primary aim is to clarify the role of both interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-disciplinary integration. The secondary goal is to provide interested readers, colleagues, and young researchers from a wide range of different academic branches across the two cultures with a crash course and a protocol to basic collaborative research. An indicative and essential bibliography is also provided. This introductory opinion piece is open for further comments, additions, suggestions, and discussions.</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13282 The Tangled Cultural History of the Axial Age 2019-10-16T14:30:18+00:00 Anders Klostergaard Petersen akp@cas.au.dk <p>Jan Assmann’s <em>Achsenzeit </em>is the most thorough presentation of thinkers who reflected on the Axial Age available today. Although the label ‘Axial Age’ was coined by Karl Jaspers in 1946, other scholars had touched upon the issue as early as 1771. From the beginning, socio-historical analyses rested on a presentist framework according to which the Axial Age was interpreted as a positive historical legacy that could be exploited to make up for the deficiencies of the present. Achsenzeit excels in the discussions covering the time span from Anquetil-Duperron to Vögelin (1975), but it disappoints in relation to current debates. Unfortunately, Assmann’s book ignores contemporary gene-culture co-evolutionary perspectives, as well as current research which argues for the convergent evolution of axial-age societies based on increased affluence, enhanced urbanization processes, and higher population density. These criticisms aside, the book is indispensable for the necessary knowledge of the pre-2000s discussion on the topic, and it is a highly pleasurable read.&nbsp;</p> 2019-10-16T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13278 Rivers of Knowledge 2019-10-16T14:30:17+00:00 Patrick Nunn pnunn@usc.edu.au <p>Ancient stories recalling memorable events can be demonstrated as enduring in recognizable form in oral (non-literate or pre-literate) cultures for several millennia. As explained in the author’s 2018 book, <em>The Edge of Memory</em> (Bloomsbury, London), some of the most compelling of these stories are those recalling coastal ‘drowning’, interpreted in most instances as recalling the rise of sea level following the end of the last Ice Age; some of these stories from Aboriginal Australia can be given minimum ages of 7000-10,000 years ago. Examples are also given of ancient stories from Australia and elsewhere that recall volcanic eruptions and meteorite falls, both of which can be dated with some degree of certainty. This paper extends the arguments in <em>The Edge of Memory</em> to an analysis of stories that appear to recall people’s responses to rising sea level more than seven millennia ago and allow insights into their thinking. It seems clear that today, confronted by a similar phenomenon, we can learn from the actions of our distant ancestors.</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13280 Evolution, Cognition, and Horror 2019-10-16T14:30:18+00:00 Mathias Clasen mc@cc.au.dk <p>Why are people attracted to scary entertainment, to stories and leisure activities designed to evoke negative emotion? How does such entertainment work, and why does it work? Why do we respond with genuine fear to flickering light on a screen? Why do our stories brim with danger and horror and monsters, sometimes far-fetched and utterly implausible monsters? The culmination of that research, so far, is my 2017 monograph <em>Why Horror Seduces</em>. In this article, I will introduce that work, which is the first book-length study of horror from an evolutionary perspective. After a brief introduction to the subject matter, I explain the main theoretical assumptions of the book. I then give a few examples of evolutionary horror theory in analytical and interpretative practice and offer some considerations on the adaptive function of horror. Finally, I reflect on the challenges and benefits of interdisciplinary work and point the way toward future studies.&nbsp;</p> 2019-10-16T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13271 A Darwinian Pilgrim’s Early Progress 2019-10-16T14:30:12+00:00 Michael Ruse mruse@fsu.edu <p>Part one of three in an autobiographical series which retraces the most significant events, collaborations, and research results of Michael Ruse’s 55-year-long career in the history and philosophy of science. In this article, Ruse’s Quaker roots, his subsequent loss of faith, and the first engagement with the study of natural science are recalled before delving deeper into his academic career. The main topics summarized in this walkthrough are considered chronologically as they developed: the epistemological demonstration that the Darwinian theory was not a narrative, or inferior, kind of science but a full-fledged, consilient research programme founded on genetics (early 1970s); the history of teleology in biological thought (mid-1970s); the sociobiology controversy (late 1970s); the so-called debunking argument and the is-ought fallacy (early 1980s).</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13273 A Darwinian Pilgrim's Middle Progress 2019-10-16T14:30:13+00:00 Michael Ruse mruse@fsu.edu <p>Part two of three in an autobiographical series which retraces the most significant events, collaborations, and research results of Michael Ruse’s 55-year-long career in the history and philosophy of science. In this article, Ruse’s first forays into philosophy are intertwined with his growing interest in the history of science. The main topics summarized in this second installment are considered thematically as they developed: “design” as a Kuhnian paradigm in the history of evolutionary biology (from the early 1970s onwards); the involvement in the McLean v. Arkansas Board of Education 1981 legal case which saw the rise of neo-creationism as organized pressure group; the exploration of the science-religion relationship (mid-1980s to 1990s); the problem of free will and the critical confrontation with the New Atheism (early 2000s); the question of accommodationism and the identification of “organism” as the root metaphor of evolutionary biology (2010s).</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13275 A Darwinian Pilgrim's Late Progress 2019-10-16T14:30:14+00:00 Michael Ruse mruse@fsu.edu <p>This is the final part of an autobiographical series which retraces the most significant events, collaborations, and research results of Michael Ruse’s 55-year-long career in the history and philosophy of science. In this installment, Ruse’s increasing engagement with historiography leads him to rethink and tackle the role of values in science. The intertwined topics summarized here are considered as they developed between the 1990s and the 2010s: the mediation between empiricism and social constructivism; the historical study of the idea of qualitative, biological “progress” in evolutionary biology as drawn from coeval social ideas; the paradox according to which “progress” is formally eschewed and yet implicitly present in modern evolutionary biology; the development of evolutionary biology from pseudoscience tied to social progress to popular science to full-fledged professional science; Darwinism as hopeful, progressive “religion” contrasted with progress-less Darwinian theory; meaning in a Darwinian world, and the development of a Darwinian existentialism.</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. http://journal.equinoxpub.com/JCH/article/view/13277 Shadows in the New Testament 2019-10-16T14:30:15+00:00 Paul Robertson paul.robertson@unh.edu <p>This article treats the roughly half dozen instances of shadows in the Christian New Testament using evolutionary-cognitive approaches and understandings. This literary-historical data set generally conforms to predictions from cognitive science in two ways. First, shadows stimulate cognitive interest due to their evolutionary ties to predation and humans as both prey species and hunter. Second, shadows fortify the status of supernatural agents due to shadows’ uncertain and shifting boundaries, which lend themselves to agency attribution. Additional discussion theorizes shadows as a type of object particularly related to religious beliefs, due to shadows’ particular set of characteristics that differ from standard folk ontologies. This unique typology is shared with certain other objects likewise possessing outsize presence in religious history such as clouds, flame, and smoke.</p> 2019-10-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd.