Living with Heritage

Involuntary Entanglements of the Anthropocene – An Introduction

Authors

  • Anatolijs Venovcevs UiT: The Arctic University of Norway
  • Torgeir Rinke Bangstad UiT: The Arctic University of Norway

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.23988

Keywords:

Introduction

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Author Biographies

Anatolijs Venovcevs, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway

Anatolijs Venovcevs is a PhD candidate in the Institute for Archaeology, History, Religious Studies, and
Theology at UiT: The Arctic University of Norway as part of the project Unruly Heritage: An Archaeology of
the Anthropocene. His current research focuses on twentieth-century single industrial mining communities in northern Russia, Norway and Canada. He researches within contemporary archaeology, industrial and historical archaeology, historical geography and GIS. He likes long walks through beautiful landscapes devastated by modernity. Address for correspondence: Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies, and Theology, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway, 9019 Tromsø, Norway

Torgeir Rinke Bangstad, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway

Torgeir Rinke Bangstad is a researcher at the Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies and Theology at UiT: The Arctic University of Norway. He is affiliated with the research project Unruly Heritage: An Archaeology of the Anthropocene and his research interests include contemporary archaeology, museums, memory and toxic heritage. He holds a PhD in cultural heritage studies from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim and has recently co-edited the volume Heritage Ecologies (Routledge, 2021) together with Þóra Pétursdóttir (University of Oslo). Address for correspondence: Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies, and Theology, UiT: The Arctic University of Norway, 9019 Tromsø, Norway.

References

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Pétursdóttir, Þ. 2019. “Anticipated Futures? Knowing the Heritage of Drift Matter.” International Journal of Heritage Studies 26 (1): 87–103. https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2019.1620835

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Published

2022-09-20

How to Cite

Venovcevs, A., & Bangstad, T. R. (2022). Living with Heritage: Involuntary Entanglements of the Anthropocene – An Introduction. Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, 9(1), 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1558/jca.23988

Issue

Section

Editorial

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