Incorporating Secularism and Related Constructs within the Critical Study of Religion

  • Christopher R. Cotter University of Edinburgh
Keywords: secularisim, world religions paradigm

References

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Published
2019-12-16
How to Cite
Cotter, C. R. (2019). Incorporating Secularism and Related Constructs within the Critical Study of Religion. Implicit Religion, 22(1), 78-85. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.40122
Section
The Religious Studies Project Podcast Transcription

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