Buddhist Studies Review http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR <p><em>Buddhist Studies Review</em>&nbsp;is published by Equinox on behalf of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ukabs.org.uk/ukabs/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">UK Association for Buddhist Studies</a>. The Association was founded in 1996 and two years later took over publication of&nbsp;<em>Buddhist Studies Review</em>, which had been run since 1983 by Russell Webb and Sara Boin-Webb. Membership in the Association includes a subscription to the journal among other benefits.You can join the Association through the membership pages on their website.&nbsp;</p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Buddhist Studies Review 0265-2897 Editorial http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13737 Peter Harvey Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 1 1 10.1558/bsrv.39701 The Etymology and Semantic Spectrum of adhimukti and Related Terms in Buddhist Texts http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13738 <p>The action noun adhimukti derives from the verb adhi-muc, not attested in Classical Sanskrit but in Pāli. It is regularly used in the passive, with the original meaning ‘to be fastened to’, and then ‘to adhere’. This meaning is not used in a concrete sense, but in a metaphorical one, referred to mind and mental objects, so that adhimukti can be used to express inclination, faith in a doctrine, and also intentional and stable representation of an image or an idea in meditative practice, sometimes with the effect of transformation of external reality. The common feature appears to be adherence or the fixing of the mind on its object.</p> Giacomo Benedetti Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 3 29 10.1558/bsrv.36122 From the Blacksmith’s Forge to the Fires of Hell http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13739 <p>Early Buddhist texts were first being composed and compiled during South Asia’s Iron Age, and thus contain many references to iron and other metal technologies. This article examines one metalworking image that came to play a special role in the imagination of early Buddhists: the red-hot iron ball. I argue that the iron ball, which comes to be a torture device in hell, force-fed by hell wardens, is a mimesis of the piṇḍapāta, or almsfood offered to monks and nuns by the laity. Around iron ball imagery clusters a set of related Buddhist concerns: anxieties about undisciplined and deceitful monks and nuns, especially in relation to taking alms; the public perception of the saṅgha; the conceptualization of Buddhist hells as an unfortunate karmic result of lacking discipline; and the relationship between these hells and Indian juridical forms of punishment.</p> Joseph Marino Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 31 51 10.1558/bsrv.37052 Do the Arahant and the Buddha Experience Dukkha and Domanassa? http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13740 <p>The Pāli Nikāyas describe a range of painful feelings that are experienced by human beings. The painful feelings are primarily divided into the categories of dukkha and domanassa. In its broader sense, dukkha covers a complete range of different types of painful or unpleasant feeling. But when it appears within a compound or together with domanassa successively within a passage, its meaning is primarily limited to physical pain while domanassa refers to mental pain. This article investigates the question of whether or not the Arahant and the Buddha experience mental pain as well as physical pain. My analysis of doctrinal explanations demonstrates that the Arahant and the Buddha are subject to experience physical pain and physical disease but not mental pain. This article also clarifies why and to what degree the Pāli tradition sees them as experiencing physical pain and disease.</p> Ashin Sumanacara Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 53 70 10.1558/bsrv.32069 The Transformation of Poṣadha/Zhai in Early Medieval China (third–sixth centuries CE) http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13741 <p>This article attempts to disentangle the semantics of zhai 齋 in early medieval China, mostly from the third century to the sixth, by examining both Indian and Chinese Buddhist sources. It demonstrates that semantic shifts in the term reflect a changing ritual context, as Chinese Buddhism rapidly took form. The article consists of two parts. The first part looks into how the Poṣadha Sūtra was first introduced to China and how the word poṣadha was employed in early āgama scriptures and the vinayas translated before the middle of the fifth century. The second part (from p. 89) examines the reception history of the lay poṣadha and the transformation that it underwent in early medieval China. The poṣadha/zhai in China eventually evolved into a religious feast centred on lay-monastic interaction in association with a variety of ritual elements, especially repentance rites.</p> Yi Ding Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 71 98 10.1558/bsrv.37072 Mobilizing Gendered Piety in Sri Lanka’s Contemporary Bhikkhunī Ordination Dispute http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13742 <p>Since the late 1980s, in defiance of Sri Lanka’s major monastic fraternities (nikāyas) and the government, Buddhist women and men have begun to organize across distinctions of national boundary and Buddhist tradition to reinstate a defunct bhikkhunī ordination lineage for renunciant women. Drawing on fieldwork from the winter of 2015–16, this article considers some of the strategies by which Sri Lanka’s bhikkhunīs and their supporters constitute the burgeoning lineage(s) as both legitimate and necessary for the continued health and vitality of an otherwise ailing Buddhist sāsana. I argue that Sri Lanka’s bhikkhunīs engage in highly-visible forms of adherence to vinaya rules and social expectations for ideal monastic behavior set against a popular discourse about the laxity of male renunciants. Such engagement is both political and soteriological; while it is aimed at fulfilling legitimizing gendered expectations of women’s piety, it is expressed primarily in terms of the eradication of personal and societal suffering through forms of practice that accord with the ideal of a pious monastic. Thus, in contrast to discourses which locate bhikkhunīs as subjects whose presence weakens the sāsana’s duration and strength, in this new discourse Sri Lanka’s bhikkhunīs become virtuous agents of social service and moral restoration. The article concludes by identifying emerging connections between this discourse and an alreadygendered xenophobic Buddhist nationalism.</p> Tyler A. Lehrer Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 99 121 10.1558/bsrv.35050 <i>The Administration of Buddhism in China: A Study and Translation of Zanning and the Topical Compendium of the Buddhist Clergy</i> (Da Song Seng shiüe 大宋僧史略), by Albert Welter http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13743 <div><em>The Administration of Buddhism in China: A Study and Translation of Zanning and the </em><em>Topical Compendium of the Buddhist Clergy</em> (Da Song Seng shiüe 大宋僧史略), by Albert Welter. Cambria Press, 2018. 722pp., Hb. $154.99. ISBN-13: 9781604979428.</div> Janine Nicol Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 123 126 10.1558/bsrv.39702 <i>Mountain Mandalas: Shugendō in Kyūshū</i>, by Allan G. Grapard http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13744 <p><em>Mountain Mandalas: Shugendō in Kyūshū</em>, by Allan G. Grapard. Bloomsbury. 2016. 320 pp. Hb. £90. ISBN–13: 9781474249003. Pb. £31. ISBN-13: 9781350044937. Ebook £34.54. ISBN-13: 9781474249027.</p> Emanuela Sala Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 127 130 10.1558/bsrv.39703 <i>Remembering the Present: Mindfulness in Buddhist Asia</i>, by Julia L. Cassaniti http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13745 <p><em>Remembering the Present: Mindfulness in Buddhist Asia</em>, by Julia L. Cassaniti. Cornell University Press, 2018. 297pp. Hb. $27.95. ISBN-13: 9781501707995.</p> Jian Cheng Shi (Ya-Chu Lee) Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 131 134 10.1558/bsrv.39704 <i>Responsible Living: Explorations in Applied Buddhist Ethics — Animals, Environment, GMOs, Digital Media</i>, by Ron Epstein http://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/13746 <p><em>Responsible Living: Explorations in Applied Buddhist Ethics — Animals, Environment, GMOs, Digital Media</em>, by Ron Epstein. Buddhist Text Translation Society, 2018. 179pp. Pb. $12, ISBN-13: 9781601030993. Ebook $5, ISBN-13: 9781601031006.</p> Nick Swann Copyright (c) 2019 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2019-10-02 2019-10-02 36 1 135 137 10.1558/bsrv.39705